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In this short lecture (9'38"), Simon outlines the basic structure of sound assessment. Describing reliability, validity, and fairness in assessment and exploring a range of different assessment forms. These range from diagnostic to synoptic (capstone), to formative and summative. Being familiar with some of the language around assessment is important in order to get the most of the literature and others' experiences. I believe that well-designed assessment is something all faculty will want to be involved in grading and marking, rather than trying to pass those duties onto others. Assessing your own students should be a fulfilling experience, and well-designed assessment enable that to happen.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

Lesson planning is more structured in K-12 and professional contexts than in most higher education institutions. This is disappointing because planning sessions, adjusting to context and level, duration of session, and cohorts, provide the basis for ongoing reflection. This video (9'36") outline as 5 step lesson planning model. A link is also provided to the word template which you are free to adapt in any way that enhances your practice.

Five-Step-lesson-plan

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

While many of us cringe at the sound of our own voice and hate seeing ourselves on film, witnessing, and reflecting upon, your own teaching performance is invaluable as a teaching enhancement technique. This brief video (1'20") introduces the concept of video (or audio) recording your own teaching practice as a point of reflection. A simple (editable and expandable) word template is also shared. This is available directly from http://www.sijen.com or by going to: http://bit.ly/micro-teach These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

One element in any teacher's enhancement toolkit is the evaluative comments provided to you from your students. Usually, these are captured at the end of a module, far too late to benefit your current students. This short video (2'18") links to a Word Document that serves as a template to support you in eliciting constructive evaluative comments from your students that will guide you in making appropriate adjustments within a course. It is important to note that students are not invited to critique you directly, rather they are asked to reflect on their experience of their learning. Any adjustments you make as a result of this process empowers students to take a degree of ownership of their own learning.

Word Document Template: Guidance to In-Class Evaluation

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

'Dyslexia: a guide for tutors' was originally developed in 2013 in the context of the UK. It's a relatively long online lecture but it has some fairly simple message. Dyslexia is not a disease or a mental illness, it is a different way of seeing the world. This presentation invites colleagues to think about dyslexia, and its associated concerns, in the light of 'multiple intelligences' and look for the opportunity to meet the needs of dyslexic students by enhancing the way they do everything to support all learners. I am not a dyslexia expert, this presentation has no diagnostic function. It is simply one practitioner's view of good practice in being inclusive.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As so many new faculty are being compelled to teach online for the first time, many heads of department, quality assurance colleagues and academic developers are unprepared for the support the needs of faculty. Developmental peer observation is a frequently used approach to provide a reflection on an individual's practise. Most of us will be familiar with Peer Observation in a classroom context, here is documentation that supports the process in the online world.

This is a brief walkthrough of the documentation designed to provide supportive peer observation online. The documentation, available as an unrestricted Microsoft Word document (see below), can be amended to your context. It is designed for developmental, rather than managerial, observations but could be easily adapted to serve both purposes. It follows a three-stage process, pre-observation, observation, and post-observation templates are provided.

Word Document: Peer Observation Online

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

This online lecture, first delivered as part of a UK University PGCert for educators, reviews the concepts of pedagogy and andragogy before going on to examine the applicability of Mezirow's transformative learning theory to professional education. It also identifies Paulo Friere and bell hooks as radical thinkers in education worthy of note. Please note that this lecture was originally intended to be supplemented with a synchronous webinar and additional readings.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 

Some quick tips on how to engage students and manage your interventions in online discussion forums. Faculty unfamiliar with supporting learners online sometimes create a huge workload for themselves by poorly structuring discussions. They may also perceive their role to answer each and every posting, which is impossible when teaching at scale. This short video is designed to at least guide you to set up your discussions appropriately.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This six-minute screencast (6'06") is a top-level set of guidelines for developing effective teaching materials. For some, it may feel like going over well-worn ground, for others it may provide pause for thought. Rationalising what constitutes learning materials seems superficially straight-forward but when one considers the different institutional interpretations of what represents 'direct' learning versus 'delf-directed' learning it soon becomes apparent that judgement is needed even here.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This ten-minute video (10'17") is a series of screen captures from live synchronous webinars taught using Adobe Connect (2015). It is annotated to give you some sense of how to manage interactivity, manage your tone, reflect on the importance of personal presence and to make use of the visual nature of the webinar interface. These examples are taken from a postgraduate teaching qualification but the 'content' is irrelevant. While it is not intended to be a blow-by-blow explanation of how to construct your webinars, once you have access to a webinar room, Connect, Collaborate or other solution, this might give you some ideas as to how you could adapt your teaching practice for this form of synchronous distance teaching. #highered #teaching #webinars

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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