Skip to content

The first formal presentation of the SOLE model has been published by IRRODL in February 2011:

Atkinson, S. (2011). Embodied and Embedded Theory in Practice: The Student-Owned Learning-Engagement (SOLE) ModelThe International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning,  12 (2), pp 1-18

Screenshot
IRRODL Vol 12, issue 2

 

The first formal presentation of the SOLE model has been published by IRRODL in February 2011:

Atkinson, S. (2011). Embodied and Embedded Theory in Practice: The Student-Owned Learning-Engagement (SOLE) ModelThe International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning,  12 (2), pp 1-18

Screenshot
IRRODL Vol 12, issue 2

Teaching quality interventions are always a challenge for an Academic Developer, walking a thin line between sanction and support, between reassurance and patronizing. Yesterday I ran a small workshop with new classroom tutors teaching Statistics. The challenges of teaching a dozen international students new statistical concepts at 5pm on a wet windy Friday evening in London needs little unpacking.
I sought to provide some tools for staff to think about their role, to reflect on how they might meet discipline goals. We focussed not on 'tips and tricks' but on the fundamentals of space and voice, and how to develop engagement with both.
We explored some classroom layouts, including the one we were in, and identified the social conventions of space that determine the learning and teaching styles that are adopted. It's a nice activity which prompts participants to identify three different disciplines being taught in three layouts illustrated when in fact all three real examples are from the same course on the same day. It prompts the question 'am I using this learning space effectively or does it constrain, and indeed determine, how I teach?'
The tools available in the space, projector, whiteboard, PowerPoint, Prezi, etc were then discussed in relationship to this space. One of the questions I like to ask is how would you teach if the familiar tools fail you (in this case, the decorators say have removed the whiteboards). On this occasion I was walking the talk because my PowerPoint presentation had no means of being projected on rhe day and I had rearranged the seating to be able to run the session differently. Useful demonstration however unwelcome! It was a nice exploration of the nature of the whiteboard as a 'canvas'. I suggested students might be encouraged to photograph the whiteboard (the mobile phonecam being almost ubiquitous) to support the idea that this was a group creative process which rewarded engagement not simple the instruction from the board.
We then explored , with some amusing examples, the nature of the English language as a stressed language and the relationship, interplay, between intonation and connotation. This is always fun, not least because I get to remind myself why I never went into acting!
This combination of being more spatially aware, of using the tools with engagement as the intent not information delivery, and of simple appreciating the power of the human voice, will hopefully develop confidence and a sense of each tutors' unique abilities to communicate.
It was a fun session to run and one I hope I get to run again soon and I would love to run it overseas too.

It's always a strange thing to find oneself positioned as an 'expert'. Today I found myself addressing 20 wide-eyed third-year statistics students on the art of the presentation. I was, it seems, the expert on presentations, and provided advice and guidance based almost entirely on what not to do, based on the cumulative experiences over educational technology conferences and educational media conferences over the last 10 years. Curiously, and worryingly, effective.

 VERSION OF THIS POST FIRST APPEARED spatkinson.wordpress.com from May 13, 2010

The following brief video presentation was prepared for a Course Team workshop at Massey University NZ in May 2010 to introduce the SOLE Model.

The SOLE model is intended to be developmental, diagnostic, evaluative and descriptive. It is borne out of a desire to make the learning design process transparent to students, to encourage staff to share ‘patterns’ of learning with each other and to provide a basis for self-evaluation and development of specific learning designs. The model is not concerned with the design of specific learning activities but rather the appropriate balance between the different modes of student engagement anticipated.

The model does not prevent an academic scheduling four hours contact time a week and delivering a didactic lecture, but it would illuminate clearly that that was the approach being undertaken. Likewise, the model in and of itself does not prevent staff from reproducing an identical pattern of learning every week through a paper or course, but again, the models’ associated toolkit would make that process clear.

The SOLE model is not prescriptive and it is possible for teams to change and modify any aspect of the toolkit to suit their needs. The intention however is to provide staff with a model of effective practice such that one might be concerned about the quality of the student learning experience if the model illustrated a consistently ‘unbalanced’ approach.

Phasing

One would anticipate that the visualisation generated by the toolkit would reflect a pattern of learning that differ from paper to paper, and from week to week. One could anticipate for example that in the first week of an undergraduate paper there would be significantly more ‘teacher-centeredness’ than in the twelfth week of a postgraduate paper. The visualisation will differ; the patterns can be expected to reflect different levels of engagement.

Centrality of Biggs Constructive Alignment

It is no coincidence that the model places the intended learning outcomes (ILO) at the centre. In each constructively aligned paper the pattern will be different because the learning outcomes, the assessment designed to illicit evidence of attainment and the patterns of teaching required to support that process will each be different. The SOLE model is precisely that, a model not a template. The model can, and should be adapted by staff to suit their particular approach to learning. It should reflect the nature both of their discipline, students existing context and the specific teaching environment.

The SOLE model was presented to colleagues in Zagreb (via Webinar) on December 8th as one possible way to explore staff preparedness for each cohort of learners they must design for.

I am delighted to be continuing my relationship with colleagues in Croatia at Centar za e-učenje and SRCE. I was asked to present Webinar on staff ‘integration’ of e-learning in their contemporary practice. The presentation for the Croatian National e-Learning Event on Wednesday 8th December comes at a rather opportune time as I have been writing about the myth of the ‘net-generation’ and the extent to which we are preparing academic staff adequately to work within contemporary expectations.

I’ve written a draft presentation entitled: Developing existing and new academic staff to integrate e-learning into their practice, that explores the need for each cohort of academic staff to revision, revitalise and reposition their teaching to suit the appropriate context in which they teach. It therefore becomes less an issue of whether there exists such a thing as a ‘net-generation‘ (I think not) but rather whether they have the reflective skills to enable them to position their practice appropriately and whether there exists learning design models that can support that practice. I cite the SOLE model as one possible approach but others certainly exist.

Webinar Image ScreencaptureIt was a great pleasure to work with colleagues at SRCE in Zagreb on Wednesday 8th for the 2nd National e-Learning Day (Here’s a full programme for the day http://bit.ly/eqk68w ) My Adobe Connect Webinar was recorded and is available online. It’s always interesting to watch yourself but I do feel confident at least about the argument. There is a need to ensure that teaching staff see the process of professional development as one that prepares them to support the learning of each successive cohort of learners in an appropriate way, not as needing to find a technologigy solution to meet the ‘current’ perceive need.

The 40 minute webinar itself has also been shared and is available from SRCE online here: https://connect.srce.hr/p39469103/

It was a great pleasure to work with colleagues at SRCE in Zagreb on Wednesday 8th for the 2nd National e-Learning Day (Here's a full programme for the day http://bit.ly/eqk68w ) My Adobe Connect Webinar was recorded and is available online. It's always interesting to watch yourself but I do feel confident at least about the argument. There is a need to ensure that teaching staff see the process of professional development as one that prepares them to support the learning of each successive cohort of learners in an appropriate way, not as needing to find a technologigy solution to meet the 'current' perceive need.

The 40 minute webinar itself has also been shared and is available from SRCE online here: https://connect.srce.hr/p39469103/

Webinar Image Screencapture
Webinar 8th December

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a great pleasure to be virtually present.

I am delighted continue my relationship with colleagues in Croatia at CARNet and at Centar za e-učenje and SRCE. I have been asked to present Webinar on staff 'integration' of e-learning in their contemporary practice. The presentation for the Croatian National e-Learning Event on Wednesday 8th December comes at a rather opportune time as I have been writing about the myth of the 'net-generation' and the extent to which we are preparing academic staff adequately to work within contemporary expectations.

2005 Workshop at CARNet, Zagreb
2005 Workshop at CARNet, Zagreb

I've written a draft presentation entitled: Developing existing and new academic staff to integrate e-learning into their practice that explores the need for each cohort of academic staff to revision, revitalise and reposition their teaching to suit the appropriate context in which they teach. It therefore becomes less an issue of whether there exists such a thing as a 'net-generation' (I think not) but rather whether they have the reflective skills to enable them to position their practice appropriately and whether there exists learning design models that can support that practice. I cite the SOLE model as one possible approach but others certainly exist.

Looks like this book chapter with Kevin Burden on the conceptual modeling of emerging technologies is finally going to see the light of day. I note the publishers site now has chapter details, download prices and chapter ISBNs. So after a long wait it's going to happen:

D'Agustino Book
Adaptation, Resistance and Access to Instructional Technologies: Assessing Future Trends In Education

Atkinson, S., & Burden, K. (2011). Using the 3V Model to Explore Virtuality, Veracity and Values in Liminal Spaces (Pages 199-215). In S. D'Agustino (Ed), Adaptation, Resistance and Access to Instructional Technologies: Assessing Future Trends In Education. Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing.

It's been an interesting processes this one. We had a journal article rejected and I was beginning to wonder if this was just too 'left field' and whether anyone would engage with it as an idea. I'm still convinced that the 3V concept has an interpretive and evaluative value but it needs a professional conversation and that means at least getting it 'out there' in a form that can be referenced in the hope dialogue follows. Here's hoping.

%d bloggers like this: