Introducing five educational domains [10]


Handout: Educational Domains


Reflection

Consider how much exposure you have already had to the world of progressive taxonomies, educational domains and lists of active verbs. Had you already heard of Bloom’s Taxonomy? Were you already aware that there are others, designed to structure a range of different skills and attributes?

Transcript:

So, I’m absolutely passionate about writing outcomes and designing courses that cover a much wider range of skills and attributes than just purely the intellectual skills. Which is why whilst I respect the work that benjamin Bloom and his colleagues did back in the 1950s. I want to just remind everyone that is just the cognitive domain. And that language is not necessarily appropriate for all of the skills that we really want students to be able to develop.

So, we will need to address the affective domain, the metacognitive domain, the psychomotor domain, and the interpersonal domain, in our language. And we need to write outcomes that are meaningfully pointed at those skills that we want students to acquire. So, I use a formulation just to remember that there are five domains that I need to address. 

You can find another alternative way of remembering it. But whenever I’m writing courses, I’m always very conscious that I want to broaden out the skills that I want my students to develop. So, you do need to recognize that whatever the limitations are being imposed on you, by your validation process, either institutionally or by some quality agency, you should try and incorporate wherever possible all five of these domains in your learning outcomes.

Now, there are sometimes limitations on the number of outcomes that you can write in a particular course, and we’re going to look at that later. But I think if you just look at this list, and you see the various skills that are expected, we need to, escape from some of the existing institutional language.

It’s not unusual for example, to see things categorized as knowledge and understanding outcomes, intellectual skills, and then transferable skills. As though all skills shouldn’t be transfer. So, I’d really encourage you to think about this quite deeply, when you start writing your courses. Now this illustration, which we’re going to explore a little bit later, has five domains incorporated all in one visualization.

And there’s then a holistic view that draws those things together and is mapped against the SOLO taxonomy. It’s really valuable to be thinking about this, as we look forward into the various verb structures that we want to use.

 

Introducing five educational domains [10]


Handout: Educational Domains


Reflection

Consider how much exposure you have already had to the world of progressive taxonomies, educational domains and lists of active verbs. Had you already heard of Bloom’s Taxonomy? Were you already aware that there are others, designed to structure a range of different skills and attributes?

Transcript:

So, I’m absolutely passionate about writing outcomes and designing courses that cover a much wider range of skills and attributes than just purely the intellectual skills. Which is why whilst I respect the work that benjamin Bloom and his colleagues did back in the 1950s. I want to just remind everyone that is just the cognitive domain. And that language is not necessarily appropriate for all of the skills that we really want students to be able to develop.

So, we will need to address the affective domain, the metacognitive domain, the psychomotor domain, and the interpersonal domain, in our language. And we need to write outcomes that are meaningfully pointed at those skills that we want students to acquire. So, I use a formulation just to remember that there are five domains that I need to address. 

You can find another alternative way of remembering it. But whenever I’m writing courses, I’m always very conscious that I want to broaden out the skills that I want my students to develop. So, you do need to recognize that whatever the limitations are being imposed on you, by your validation process, either institutionally or by some quality agency, you should try and incorporate wherever possible all five of these domains in your learning outcomes.

Now, there are sometimes limitations on the number of outcomes that you can write in a particular course, and we’re going to look at that later. But I think if you just look at this list, and you see the various skills that are expected, we need to, escape from some of the existing institutional language.

It’s not unusual for example, to see things categorized as knowledge and understanding outcomes, intellectual skills, and then transferable skills. As though all skills shouldn’t be transfer. So, I’d really encourage you to think about this quite deeply, when you start writing your courses. Now this illustration, which we’re going to explore a little bit later, has five domains incorporated all in one visualization.

And there’s then a holistic view that draws those things together and is mapped against the SOLO taxonomy. It’s really valuable to be thinking about this, as we look forward into the various verb structures that we want to use.

 

Introducing five educational domains [10]


Handout: Educational Domains


Reflection

Consider how much exposure you have already had to the world of progressive taxonomies, educational domains and lists of active verbs. Had you already heard of Bloom’s Taxonomy? Were you already aware that there are others, designed to structure a range of different skills and attributes?

Transcript:

So, I’m absolutely passionate about writing outcomes and designing courses that cover a much wider range of skills and attributes than just purely the intellectual skills. Which is why whilst I respect the work that benjamin Bloom and his colleagues did back in the 1950s. I want to just remind everyone that is just the cognitive domain. And that language is not necessarily appropriate for all of the skills that we really want students to be able to develop.

So, we will need to address the affective domain, the metacognitive domain, the psychomotor domain, and the interpersonal domain, in our language. And we need to write outcomes that are meaningfully pointed at those skills that we want students to acquire. So, I use a formulation just to remember that there are five domains that I need to address. 

You can find another alternative way of remembering it. But whenever I’m writing courses, I’m always very conscious that I want to broaden out the skills that I want my students to develop. So, you do need to recognize that whatever the limitations are being imposed on you, by your validation process, either institutionally or by some quality agency, you should try and incorporate wherever possible all five of these domains in your learning outcomes.

Now, there are sometimes limitations on the number of outcomes that you can write in a particular course, and we’re going to look at that later. But I think if you just look at this list, and you see the various skills that are expected, we need to, escape from some of the existing institutional language.

It’s not unusual for example, to see things categorized as knowledge and understanding outcomes, intellectual skills, and then transferable skills. As though all skills shouldn’t be transfer. So, I’d really encourage you to think about this quite deeply, when you start writing your courses. Now this illustration, which we’re going to explore a little bit later, has five domains incorporated all in one visualization.

And there’s then a holistic view that draws those things together and is mapped against the SOLO taxonomy. It’s really valuable to be thinking about this, as we look forward into the various verb structures that we want to use.

 

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