Course structure for OTHE101 [5]

Handout: IFET Course Structure


Reflection

Consider how best to approach the course. Because you can navigate your way through the course freely, there is no requirement to complete one topic before visiting the next, you are at liberty to seek out the learning you want. However, there is a logic to the structure of the course, so unless you have a specific approach that suits you, I would suggest you work through the course in the way it is laid out. You must mark all pages complete to be awarded the certificate of completion.

Transcript:

This course, introducing five educational taxonomies, has a logical structure. You are free to navigate your way through it. It’s a free-form course. You are not required to complete one topic or one lesson before you move on to the next. You can navigate your way through the course freely if you have got a particular need.

But there is a logic to the course structure. So, this is the course introduction. There is a substantial part of the course itself, which is the lesson entitled of ‘using educational taxonomies’ that has four topics within it. One deals with educational taxonomies, one with progressive taxonomies, one introducing five different domains and then looking at those in more detail.

There is then a lesson to bring things together, a course summary. And then there is a final assessment. It’s a relatively straightforward quiz that will trigger the issuing of your certificate. You do have to mark all individual topics as being completed to trigger that award.

 

Course structure for IFET [5]

Handout: IFET Course Structure


Reflection

Consider how best to approach the course. Because you can navigate your way through the course freely, there is no requirement to complete one topic before visiting the next, you are at liberty to seek out the learning you want. However, there is a logic to the structure of the course, so unless you have a specific approach that suits you, I would suggest you work through the course in the way it is laid out. You must mark all pages complete to be awarded the certificate of completion.

Transcript:

This course, introducing five educational taxonomies, has a logical structure. You are free to navigate your way through it. It’s a free-form course. You are not required to complete one topic or one lesson before you move on to the next. You can navigate your way through the course freely if you have got a particular need.

But there is a logic to the course structure. So, this is the course introduction. There is a substantial part of the course itself, which is the lesson entitled of ‘using educational taxonomies’ that has four topics within it. One deals with educational taxonomies, one with progressive taxonomies, one introducing five different domains and then looking at those in more detail.

There is then a lesson to bring things together, a course summary. And then there is a final assessment. It’s a relatively straightforward quiz that will trigger the issuing of your certificate. You do have to mark all individual topics as being completed to trigger that award.

 

Course outline for DEILO [5]

Handout: Course outline for DEILO


Reflection

Consider how best to approach the course. Because you can navigate your way through the course freely, there is no requirement to complete one topic before visiting the next, you are at liberty to seek out the learning you want. However, there is a logic to the structure of the course, so unless you have a specific approach that suits you, I would suggest you work through the course in the way it is laid out. You must mark all pages complete to be awarded the certificate of completion.

Transcript:

This course is ‘designing effective intended learning outcomes’. And we are going cut through the verbiage, all of the active verb lists, and look at the more fundamental structure of an intended learning outcome, and why they are useful, and how you use them in your course design.

Now, we’ve got a series of lessons. 
Each lesson has topics within it. You can see that I have allocated some time with each of these lessons. Now, if you were to do everything within individual topic, the chances are that would extend the amount of time. But if you were to just watch the video, do the reflective activity or do the quiz, you would meet these time expectations. 

It’s just to give you an idea as to the amount of commitment that the course expects of.

You will also notice there are two assessment points. So, the first assessment point during the ‘well-structured intended learning outcomes’ lesson is completely voluntary. It is an opportunity for you to submit some draft outcomes to me and get some human feedback, some subjective feedback. I’ll do my best to support you in any way I can.

The last bit of assessment, that comes as the final assessment of the course, is a relatively straightforward quiz that triggers the issuing of your certificate.

So, you can see that we’ve got a number of different lessons. Each covering a different aspect of intended learning outcomes. 
The first is an introduction, a broad introduction. The second looks at the context, your particular validation context. The third looks at using educational taxonomies. So beyond the very conventional use of Bloom’s intellectual taxonomy, we’re going to extend that out and I am then going to explore how you might structure different learning outcomes using those different taxonomies. We then look at the nature of a well-structured outcome, what it actually means. And then we are going to look at how it might impact on your course design, including assessment. There is then a course summary, a takeaway, and then the final assessment.
Best of luck. 

I Look forward to working with you.

Role of ILOs in course design [10]


Handout: Role of ILO in Course Design


Reflection

How much of the preparation has already been done before you are considering the nature of your well-structured intended learning outcomes? Have you already established student personas or profiles? Have you reviewed the discipline to see what your learners will want t graduate with in future years? Are you up to date with the current tools and technologies used by graduates when they join the workforce?

Transcript:

We need to consider where in the course or programme design process we actually write our intended learning outcomes.

We certainly don’t write them at the very beginning, because at the very beginning, we wouldn’t necessarily have worked out what the student personas were going to be, student profiles. We wouldn’t necessarily have identified the needs and expectations of the students that we were trying to teach.

We certainly wouldn’t do it before we’ve looked at the content, the discipline content. We would want to think about how the discipline or profession has changed or is changing. We would want to also have looked at the media choices, tools, and technologies that those graduates will be expected to be able to use once they are successful.

Then of course,  having done that foundational work, we can then write our intended learning outcomes. And having done that, we can then design our assessment to assess those outcomes. We can then design learning and teaching activities to give students the opportunity to essentially rehearse towards that assessment. Then we can design feedback and we can design evaluation.

Now, this is the eight-stage learning design framework, which is my learning design framework for course design. But the important thing I want you to note here is the relationship between outcomes, assessment, activities, and feedback. That is essentially the constructive alignment loop that we need to always bear in mind whenever we think about intended learning outcomes.

 

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