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In this short video (5'52"), Simon touches on three basic principles of programming assessments. The first is that it should be programme wide, the second that assessing outcomes not content provides future flexibility, and the third that summative (or credit-bearing) assessments do not have to be final or terminal assessments. Assessment is one of the most difficult areas for faculty to become comfortable with. Most will have experienced badly designed assessment themselves and their expectations of their academic managers, programme leaders and their students are often low. This is a shame because well-designed assessment can be a pleasure for both students and faculty.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

This short lecture (10'22") presents the fundamentals of assessment for learning. Often referred to as formative assessment, I prefer to use the terms 'assessment for learning' and 'assessment of learning' instead of formative and summative. This is because 'summative assessment' is so often conflated with the notion of 'terminal assessment' that only happens at the end of a course of learning. In truth, assessment is a powerful motivator for learning if structured well. In this lecture, I outline the purposes, contexts and strategies that all educators should be reflecting on as they design their courses.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This short lecture covers the essential details of deep, surface and strategic learning as described by Marton & Säljö. (1976). It invites the watcher to reflect on their own strategies (as a learner) and those of their students. Simon then goes on to suggest five considerations from a course designers perspective.

Marton, F., & Säljö, R. (1976). On Qualitative Differences in Learning: I—Outcome and Process*. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 46(1), 4–11. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8279.1976.tb02980.x

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

This excerpt (8'30") is from the 'wrap-up closing keynote delivered by Simon Atkinson at the Estonian e-Universities Conference held in April 2009 in Tartu, Estonia. Simon builds on comments made by conference contributors to reflect on issues such as media environment, cultural priorities, and the breadth of the state curriculum.

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In this short lecture (9'38"), Simon outlines the basic structure of sound assessment. Describing reliability, validity, and fairness in assessment and exploring a range of different assessment forms. These range from diagnostic to synoptic (capstone), to formative and summative. Being familiar with some of the language around assessment is important in order to get the most of the literature and others' experiences. I believe that well-designed assessment is something all faculty will want to be involved in grading and marking, rather than trying to pass those duties onto others. Assessing your own students should be a fulfilling experience, and well-designed assessment enable that to happen.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

Lesson planning is more structured in K-12 and professional contexts than in most higher education institutions. This is disappointing because planning sessions, adjusting to context and level, duration of session, and cohorts, provide the basis for ongoing reflection. This video (9'36") outline as 5 step lesson planning model. A link is also provided to the word template which you are free to adapt in any way that enhances your practice.

Five-Step-lesson-plan

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

While many of us cringe at the sound of our own voice and hate seeing ourselves on film, witnessing, and reflecting upon, your own teaching performance is invaluable as a teaching enhancement technique. This brief video (1'20") introduces the concept of video (or audio) recording your own teaching practice as a point of reflection. A simple (editable and expandable) word template is also shared. This is available directly from http://www.sijen.com or by going to: http://bit.ly/micro-teach These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

One element in any teacher's enhancement toolkit is the evaluative comments provided to you from your students. Usually, these are captured at the end of a module, far too late to benefit your current students. This short video (2'18") links to a Word Document that serves as a template to support you in eliciting constructive evaluative comments from your students that will guide you in making appropriate adjustments within a course. It is important to note that students are not invited to critique you directly, rather they are asked to reflect on their experience of their learning. Any adjustments you make as a result of this process empowers students to take a degree of ownership of their own learning.

Word Document Template: Guidance to In-Class Evaluation

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

This brief video (2'07") is a reminder of the structural support that intense learning outcomes provide to the course design process. Having an understanding of the need to align course/module outcomes with programme outcomes, and to differentiate these reassessed outcomes from non-assessed topic/weekly level objectives is important. It is important because well-aligned learning outcomes provides scaffolding to all students' learning.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

A brief explanation (2'22") of the central importance of designing well-structured intended learning outcomes for courses. Five domains of learning, details of which are available here: https://sijen.com/research-interests/taxonomies/ are all important in a balanced course. Structuring outcomes with an active verb, subject and context are also shared.

These resources from 2013-2017 are being shared to support colleagues new to teaching online in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Consultancy for International Higher Education from Simon Paul Atkinson

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